Foreign Rights

Matthes & Seitz Berlin is a German independent publishing house founded in 2004 by Andreas Rötzer. It was established in the tradition of Matthes & Seitz Munich, a publishing house founded by Axel Matthes and Claus Seitz in 1977. Matthes & Seitz Berlin publishes about 80 titles per year in fiction and non-fiction.

The fiction list includes contemporary authors from Germany, like Frank Witzel (winner of the German Book Prize 2015), Esther Kinsky, Angela Steidele, Philip Schönthaler, and Jakob Nolte. Matthes & Seitz Berlin is not only known for German literature, but also for the translations of contemporary and classic French literature like Antonin Artaud, Emmanuel Carrère, Céline Minard and Éric Vuillard, the winner of the Prix Goncourt 2017. Among the strong list of Russian literature you find Warlam Schalamow, Iliazd, Alexander Ilitchevski and Alexander Goldstein.

Non-fiction has always had a central place in Matthes & Seitz's program, especially philosophy, political theory, and art and cultural studies. Translations from the French and English play a large part, as do prominent German authors like Jürgen Goldstein (winner of the Leipzig Book Fair Prize 2016). The series Fröhliche Wissenschaft (The Joyful Wisdom), with its short essays, is a prominent stage for presenting audacious new philosophers. Its authors, who include Byung-chul Han and Marcus Steinweg, have been translated into numerous languages.

In 2013 Matthes & Seitz Berlin established a new cornerstone in its program with the series Naturkunden (Natural Sciences), which publishes books whose design matches nature's beauty, bringing nature writing, movement, space, ecology, and humanity into focus. In order to stimulate German literary voices writing about nature Matthes & Seitz Berlin donates the "German Price for Nature Writing".

To know more about our publications we invite you to have a look at our latest foreign rights guides:

Fiction 2017

Non-fiction 2017

Modern Classics


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